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Project Information
Project Title:  Potential association between inflammatory markers and vitamin D status on cardiometabolic risk factors among Indigenous populations
Period:  from: 2019-07-01 to: 2021-06-30  
Principal Investigator(s): Zuk, Aleksandra Marta  
Co-Investigators:  
Supervisors: Tsuji, Leonard James  
Previous Investigators/Supervisors:  
Institution: University of Toronto Scarborough (ON)  
Department:  
Program: Fellowship - PA: Research in First Nations, Métis and/or Inuit Health 
Assigned PRC: FAH 
Primary Institute: Indigenous Peoplesí Health 
Primary Theme: Social/Cultural/Environmental/Population Health 
Keywords: CARDIO-METABOLIC RISK FACTORS, EFFETS ENVIRONNEMENTAUX SUR LA SANTÉ, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON HEALTH, INDIGENOUS HEALTH, INFLAMMATION, LES EFFETS ENVIRONNEMENTAUX SUR LA SANTÉ, MEDIATION ANALYSIS, VITAMIN D 
Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are both inflammatory related conditions that disproportionately affect Indigenous people in Canada. Multilevel influences both individual and environmental have been shown to affect Indigenous populations cardiometabolic risk status. Vitamin D is an important nutrient for human health but has also been recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties, downregulating inflammatory pathways. Currently, measures of vitamin D and inflammatory biomarkers (a proxy for inflammatory diseases) data among Indigenous groups are lacking. For the proposed research data from the "Nituuchischaayihtitaau Aschii Multi-Community Environment and Health Study in Eeyou Istchee" will be used to examine the chronic subclinical inflammation on cardiometabolic risk factors. Next, explore if factors such as vitamin D modify these inflammatory characteristics that are shown to contribute to CVD and T2DM. Additionally, assess the importance of time-on-land activities as it related to Cree health and wellbeing. This research will serve to increase the knowledge of how systemic inflammatory pathways contribute to metabolic dysfunctions, and if vitamin D, which is shown to have anti-inflammatory properties mitigates this relationship among high-risk and vulnerable populations. Findings from this research will provide important information on exposures that are increasingly shown to contribute to cardiovascular and metabolic risk in humans. 

Funding Information
Fiscal Year Amount
2019-20 $55,000
2020-21 $55,000
Total: $110,000